5.3 Precautions you may take to keep yourself safe

  • Read the incident log book and business policy guidance for your workplace, since they provide a wealth of important information.
  • Learn the layout of the building or location where you will be working. It is a good idea to be aware of the evacuation strategy, as well as the placement of fire extinguishers, fire escapes, and first aid items.
  • Maintain an up-to-date list of contact numbers for all building inhabitants in the case of an emergency.
  • Can numerous entrances be blocked or controlled electronically to allow you to control access to the building if needed
  • Terrorism, fire, or bomb threat/evacuation are examples of emergency situations.
  • Are common areas well lit? If they are not, report it? If they are not, please report it.
  • If a panic alarm is installed, it should be checked on a regular basis so that you are confident you will receive an adequate reaction when it is needed.
  • Always keep a method of contact with you, such as a phone, radio, or a panic alarm.
  • CCTV systems may deter some crimes and aid in the investigation and punishment of criminals in the event of an incident. It is advantageous if receptionists are familiar with the equipment.
  • If a CCTV monitor is installed, keep an eye on it.
  • Check the common spaces, including the restrooms, on a regular basis to verify they are secure and nothing has been left behind. If you come across anything suspect, please report it.
  • Lock the doors to rooms that are not in use.
  • Keep personal belongings or valuables, including mobile phones, away from the main desk – lock them away or keep them out of sight.
  • Before leaving your desk, lock it and protect all office keys, alarm codes, company information, and equipment.
  • Keep critical or confidential firm information out of the public eye. To safely dispose of it, use a shredder.
  • Have a procedure in place for dealing with conflicts or problems.